Disability CNG

Cornell Disability CNG banner

 

Welcome!

 

Who we are:

The Cornell University Disability Colleague Network Group is a university-sponsored employee resource group. Our mission is to raise awareness, serve as an educational resource, provide support, and offer peer mentorship for those working with short-term or long-term disabilities - their supervisors, colleagues, allies, and other supporters. Through both disseminating disability-related information and resources via various campus communication mechanisms, and networking opportunities, we hope to increase the work/life balance, recruitment and retention of faculty and staff with disabilities.

 

What we do:

Our group has weekly opportunities to come together informally. Once a month we come together for a meeting which usually features a presentation or facilitated discussion around a topic of significance for the Cornell staff/faculty disability community. We network with other groups both internal and external to Cornell, and organize opportunities to support our community. We also identify opportunities for staff and faculty with disabilities to engage with University leaders in efforts to create a more positive campus climate, and enhance workplace inclusion, for our community.  

 

Sign Up for the Disability CNG

 

 

Events & Activities

 

Weekly Meetups & Third Thursday Time to Talk Sessions

We meet virtually every Thursday at 3:00 pM and offer space for people to connect. On the Third Thursday of each month we have a guest speaker that presents on a topic.  Meetings often include facilitated discussions or presentations of interest to our community.  Join our mailing list using the red signup button above to learn what's coming up next and to join our weekly discussions! 

 

Meet Our Board

Headshot of Aubrey Lang

Aubrey Lang (Co-Chair)

Hello, my name is Aubrey Lang.  My formal educational is in Human Services and I currently work in Human Resources (HR).  After working for Social Services as a case worker, I became employed by Cornell University in 2003; I worked in the Diversity office at The Johnson Graduate School of Management, before joining the Cornell HR Benefits office where I have been working since 2007.  When I started at Cornell, I was not considered disabled; in 2004 while pregnant, I developed a life altering blood clot, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), that has left me with a chronic condition known as Post Thrombotic Syndrome.  I also manage issues stemming from asthma/allergies and Lyme disease.  In 2017, I lost my brother, a Wounded Warrior, to suicide; in his memory, my family and I created Team Timmy in an effort to raise awareness/support for Traumatic Brain Injury, Veteran Resources, and Suicide awareness/prevention.  Helping others through their disability journey, has helped bring purpose to my pain and I have been grateful to be involved with the DCNG since it began in 2011.  As co-chair, one of my roles is planning our Time to Talk sessions; these are monthly, hour long meetings with a presenter or planned topic for discussion.  In my personal life, I enjoy nature walks, event planning, and scrapbooking.  There is much diversity in disability, but there are also many similarities to our experiences.  Please know you are not alone and feel free to reach out with any benefit questions, ideas for our Time to Talk sessions &/or other ways we can assist DCNG members with work/life balance.  Best wishes forward, Aubrey  AJL63@cornell.edu  

 

Headshot of Erin Sember-Chase

Erin Sember-Chase (Co-Chair)

Hello, my name is Erin Sember-Chase and I’m one of the co-chairs of the DCNG.  I’ve been involved with the group since it’s conception, and I’ve worked at Cornell since 2002.  I currently serve as Assistant Director for Student Disability Services (SDS).  Prior to joining SDS, I’ve held various positions at Cornell including in Residential Programs, and in the ILR Employment and Disability Institute where I co-designed and co-taught the ILR Introduction to Disability Studies course for five semesters.   I myself have a craniofacial condition that includes a hearing impairment. Throughout my time at CU, I’ve seen our campus evolve in its understanding and appreciation of disability being an integral part of our diversity.  Many of us with disabilities have had our own unique experiences at Cornell and/or in our specific work areas, in terms of how accessible it is or how equal and included we feel as employees and community members. I believe any efforts Cornell makes to consider, and improve, campus climate for diverse employees needs to be inclusive of us and the disability experience too.  I see the DCNG as an important avenue for ensuring employees with disabilities and chronic health conditions have representation and a voice in all matters that affect our workplace and campus community.  I look forward to engaging with you!

 

Headshot of Susan Morse

Susan Morse (Member-At-Large)

Good Day! My name is Susan Morse and I work for Procurement and Payment Services in the Division of Financial Affairs. I have worked for Cornell for thirty-six years in three different departments/units. Starting in the Vet School part-time then moved to the University Libraries and now as Procurement Agent with a concentration of Lab and Science, Animal and Agriculture, Gases and other commodities. I am pleased to be on the board as I was not disabled when first working and became disabled about 12 years ago when I had to have joint replacements due to osteo and psoriatic arthritis. This certainly left me with many challenges at work and home. My experience I hope will help others that might face the same changes I had to deal with on a day-to-day basis. If I can ever be of help, please feel free to contact me at sm32@cornell.edu.

 

Andrea Haelin-Mott (EA Representative) 

Hi I am Andrea Haenlin-Mott and I have been with the University since 1995 and I am currently the ADA Coordinator for Facilities and  Campus Services, within the division of Facilities Management.  I have been on the Employee Assembly for the past four years, two years as the FCS Representative and for the past two years, I have been the Disability Representative, At-Large.  As a person who has used a wheelchair for  over 30 years, I bring the perspective of inclusion of people with obvious and non-obvious disabilities and facilitating a culture that includes all perspectives of what “accessibility” is.  The work that we do on campus to make our facilities and campus more physically accessible in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act is the first step, it’s our culture of inclusion and program accessibility that we are continually striving  to improve.  Accessible programs, services and activities are key to making Cornell University inclusive not only diverse.  I am pleased to be part of the Disability Colleague Network Group and am pleased to be able to share resources and perspectives both personal and professional with colleagues and learn from them as well!

Resources

 

The Disability Information website provides detailed information and resources to promote an accessible, usable and welcoming environment for faculty, staff, students, and visitors with disabilities, including an accessibility map, event planning guide, emergency planning, and Cornell’s Inclement Weather Program.

Related:

 

Time to Talk Sessions

Time to Talk is a 60-minute conversation with Cornell staff regarding relevant issues affecting the disabled community. Below you will find a copy of these presentations, as well as video links to view these sessions (when available):

  • May 20, 2021: Brandon Brylinsky, Accessibility Services in CIT [PDF]